Free Anne of Green Gables Series Books Online

We have added the complete Anne of Green Gables Series to our website as free online books.

For the first time ever, Island Spirit PEI has combined the leading online encyclopedia, e-book and audio books of the Anne of Green Gables series by L. M. Montgomery.

Our encyclopedia is Wikipedia.  It’s a “wiki”, a collective knowlege tool made by many hands.  It’s not the Bible of authority because of this but is also awsome in scope and a great place to start a search as Google will tell you.

Project Gutenberg is the largest collection of e-books online and also has audio books as well.

Librivox has mutiple narrators and an option to download the entire book as a compressed file. (.zip).

These sites along with much more Anne of Green Gables and L. M. (Lucy Maud) Montgomery content is available on our website. where we build all the best online into a one stop shop.

Everything Anne

It’s Everything Anne time again in Ontario!

A fun Anne of Green Gables event at Bala's Museum

A fun Anne of Green Gables event at Bala's Museum

On July 24th 1:30 to 4:00 pm at Bala’s Museum we are in for a treat.

3 Legged Races & Sack Races

Egg-on-a-spoon Races

Free Popcorn & Cake

Prizes for Best Character Costumers (cosplay)

Bala’s Museum – With Memories of Lucy Maud Montgomery is home to one of, if not the most impressive historical collections of Anne of Green Gables memorabilia in the world.

Their name shows local pride and respect for the author, but don’t let that fool you into thinking they are like on our favorite heroine.

Everything the classic hardcovers, collectibles, family heirlooms and even the Lady of Shallot boat from the motion picture.

As we found out last week, it is certainly worth ride to Bala’s Museum in the Cranberry Capital of Canada.

ISPEI welcomes The Anne of Green Gables and L. M. Montgomery Lexicon to the Blogroll

We are very happy to introduce The Anne of Green Gables and L. M. Montgomery Lexicon to our Blogroll.

The Lexicon has become a leading clearinghouse of Anne and Montgomery content.

If you ever wanted to explore Anne’s World and the writings of Montgomery online this is one site you don’t want to miss.

The menu includes:

  1. About the author
  2. list of e-texts
  3. bibliography
  4. flimography
  5. creation and publication
  6. locations
  7. timelines (by leading character)
  8. library
  9. recipes (scrumptious?  The names sound nice for sure.)
  10. book cover gallery ( a MUST see!)
  11. Famous fans
  12. book mentions
  13. memorabilia
  14. quizzes
  15. games
  16. and e-cards
  17. blog
  18. links to other LMM sites
  19. shop
  20. guestbook

Check it out.

The Rothesay-born mezzo soprano who lives in Toronto says she’s a fan of Anne of Green Gables. ‘She is such a feisty, strong-willed character.’

Click to Enlarge
Candace McLean/canadaeast news service
q Age?

a 23

q Provenance?

a I am from Rothesay, but I currently live in Toronto. I am finishing my masters in opera performance and performing at the University of Toronto.

q Why opera?

a I love singing, acting, learning languages and have always been at home on the stage. My voice has a classical and operatic quality, which was evident even before my voice started to develop from voice lessons. I also love musical theatre – anything with singing, acting and dancing.

q What was your breakthrough moment?

a After my first year of university, I went to Mozart’s most famous opera, Marriage of Figaro, in New York City with The Acadia Vocal Ensemble. I became very passionate about opera and vocal technique. I always loved the theatre, but opera really seemed to fit.

q What would you be if you weren’t an opera singer?

a An actor; I love impersonating a character and using my emotions to communicate to an audience. Or a yoga teacher; I may even do it in conjunction with opera singing. Or a psychologist, because I love listening to people and their stories, analyzing situations and learning about behaviours.

q What are you working on next?

a The role of the child in Ravel’s French opera L’enfant et les sortileges.

q What place on earth inspires you?

a I love Italy – Rome, Tuscanny and the Amalfi coast. There is so much beauty in that country, so much history.

q Your current obsession?

a Balancing healthy eating with my love for sweets.

q What place in New Brunswick inspires you?

a Ever since I was a little girl, I have always loved the Saint John City Market. With a ceiling shaped like the bottom of a ship, the long building is filled with artisans, fresh fruit and vegetables, fish and poultry, crafts, bustling people – both artistic and business types. In memories, it is always there; it doesn’t leave with the changing of the seasons, and it is home. There really is no place like home … and I have a pair of bright and shiny red shoes to get me there.

q Secret indulgence?

a Toffee, chocolate and caramel, pies and cookies, but I am not sure how much of a secret it is.

q Your favourite hero of fiction?

a Anne of Green Gables, because she is such a feisty, strong-willed character who knows what she wants. And she is a well-known and loved Maritime fictional character.

q What is your greatest extravagance?

a Clothes. I love to dress nicely and have a classy wardrobe.

q What is your greatest fear?

a Failure. I want to succeed in my career, my relationships and my finances, have good health and still have time, energy and money to give to society.

q Greatest joy?

a To love and be loved in return – in my personal and professional life.

q Your favourite opera?

a Carmen. It is filled with passion, tragedy, wit, humour, sensuality, dancing and high drama. The orchestration, vocal writing, libretto, language and style are an absolutely spectacular package. It is the perfect musical drama, in my mind. I would love to perform the role someday.

q Favourite paintings on Earth?

a Impressionist paintings by Monet, Degas and Renoir because they are very beautiful, but they depict nature or people in a way that is not exact or defined; the artist interprets a scene and is free to colour outside of the lines. Reproductions of paintings by Degas on notebooks and posters have been cherished gifts since I was a little ballerina.

q Favourite painting by a New Brunswick artist?

a A drawing of a circle of dancers by my uncle, Brian Perkins, who worked for Festival-by-the-Sea. The festival is no longer active, but it is a part of my fond memories of summers in Saint John.

q What are you reading?

a Eat, Love, Pray by Elizabeth Gilbert

q What’s on your iPod?

a Dance and pop music, a bit of R&B, several opera albums and some rehearsal recordings of myself.

q What is the greatest public misconception about opera?

a That is is stuffy and boring and only for old people. It is entertaining, sexy and high drama!

q Your most treasured possession?

a A beautiful diamond ring from my great, great aunt Jennie Fitzgerald who was 111 years old when she died. She was a vibrant and cheerful lady, and I enjoyed visiting her at the Loch Lomond Villa, where she lived for 25 years.

q What is your favourite performance venue?

a In Rome, Italy, there is a magnificent courtyard near Piazza Navona, where I performed with Operafestival di Roma, called the Palazzo della Sapienza. The façade of the church provides an ideal scenic background for the opera, and the four-sided courtyard is a vibrant acoustical space.

Built in the 15th century and for nearly 500 years the seat of the original University of Rome, the Palazzo now houses the library of the Senate of the Roman Republic. The famous church, S. Ivo alla Sapienza, built inside the courtyard, is considered one of the architectural masterpieces of Rome.

q What is your motto?

a Life is a daring and bold adventure. Cherish yesterday, live today and dream tomorrow.

q What opera singer would you like to hear in person before you die?

a More like, who would I like to hear before they die?! lol or stop singing … Frederica von Stade. She is a beautiful mezzo soprano that has achieved abundant international acclaim and has made many recordings. I think my voice is a lot like hers and she is definately one of my role models.

Source: The Telegraph Jounral

Published in: Uncategorized on March 15, 2009 at 2:29 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , , , ,

‘Anne of Green Gables’ is an evergreen

COMMENTARY

The sheer vitality of L.M. Montgomery’s adventure-seeking 1908 title character is as fresh as ever at 100.

The planks that made up her bedroom wall did not fit together properly, so when she would wake up on winter mornings in an old house on Prince Edward Island, Canada, often there were snowdrifts on the floor. To keep warm while she wrote her stories, she had to curl up her legs and sit on her feet. Her secondhand typewriter lacked a “w” key.

Still she wrote. (Or “rote,” as it would have appeared in her typewritten version.) Obstacles, hardships, setbacks, impediments — they counted for nothing. Lucy Maud Montgomery, who roomed with relatives because her mother had died when she was an infant and her father left to seek his fortune elsewhere, was a small woman with a staggeringly strong will. Her imagination was a driving force that would not be denied.

When Montgomery finished her first novel, she mailed it to publisher after publisher. The rejection slips piled up like the snowdrifts in that bedroom.

And then, after more than two dozen publishers had said no, one finally said yes, and the young orphan known as Anne Shirley — don’t forget the “e” at the end of “Anne,” or she’ll let you know about it — was born into the world of readers.

“Anne of Green Gables” was published in June 1908, which means that soon it will be a century old. Yet “old” doesn’t go with the character, because if there is one thing we know about Anne, it’s that this lively, redheaded streak of exuberance, no matter her chronological age, is now and forevermore associated with youth.

Montgomery ultimately would write 24 novels, including seven more about Anne’s adventures on the ruggedly beautiful island that constitutes Canada’s smallest province. She’d also account for 530 short stories and more than 500 poems. Anne, however, was easily her most famous creation. Before Montgomery’s death in 1942 at age 67, she saw the child of her imagination — the plucky, fearless, boundary-pushing girl who was a perpetual magnet for trouble — become an international sensation. Her story was made into several movies and it inspired fan letters from around the world.

A paperback copy of any volume in the series will cost you about $5, which means that you can jump into Anne’s world for the price of a Starbucks venti latte. Trust me: After a few rollicking, helter-skelter chapters, you won’t need the caffeine anyway.

Anne has a habit of getting into “scrapes,” as her guardian, the dour Marilla, puts it. In fact, that is the chief pleasure of the Anne books: They recognize, as so many other books with young females as protagonists do not, that girls like to run and jump and get dirty and explore the woods and have adventures just as much as boys do. A century after Anne got herself tangled up in scrape after scrape, the lesson still hasn’t sunk in. The recent bestseller “The Dangerous Book for Boys” (2007) is great — but its prejudice is plain in its title. Don’t bother telling me about “The Daring Book for Girls” (2007), a thin attempt to play catch-up; all you need to know is that when USA Today reviewed the latter, the headline was: “Books for Girls Chase After the Boys.” Can’t you see Anne cringing at that?

Source: The Los Angles Times

Anne makes a very intersting list of literary heriones

8 Literary Heroines: Sisters Doin’ It For Themselves – by Sara Newton

Sara has put together a really nice review of inspiring literary heriones which inclued Anne Shirley of course.
I’m not familiar with Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell but the story is amazing.


Rosemary Dunsmore Wins Actra Award

ad-anne4-728x90v3
Canadian film and TV actors feted TheStar.com – Entertainment – Canadian film and TV actors feted

February 21, 2009

Rosemary Dunsmore, Nicholas Campbell and Jamie Watson won ACTRA Awards last night at the annual gala honouring outstanding performances, hosted by the Toronto chapter of the Canadian actors’ union.

Dunsmore, known for her roles as Katherine Brooke in Anne of Green Gables: The Sequel, Aunt Abigail in Road to Avonlea and the title role in CBC series Mom P.I., won for her performance as the mother of a lesbian trying to have a baby with her partner in the low-budget festival-circuit movie The Baby Formula.

Campbell, who played the title role in Da Vinci’s Inquest and has more than 40 starring film and television credits, including The Insiders, Street Legal, Flashpoint and The Border, won for playing Shorty McAdoo in TV miniseries The Englishman’s Boy.

Watson, an accomplished comic, is a veteran voice-over actor. He won for his performance in the children’s animated TV series Peep and the Big Wide World.

Peter Keleghan was presented with ACTRA Toronto’s Award of Excellence by Leah and Gordon Pinsent for his body of work.

A strong advocate of Canadian arts, Keleghan is a familiar face for his work on The Newsroom, Made in Canada, The Red Green Show, Billable Hours, Murdoch Mysteries and Slings and Arrows. He had three feature films released in 2008: Eating Buccaneers, The Bend and Coopers’ Camera. He also recently finished shooting the pilot Eighteen to Life for CBC.

The gala, hosted by Teresa Pavlinek and featuring a performance by Stephanie Martin, was scheduled to be held last night at the Carlu events theatre.

“Receiving an ACTRA Award from one’s peers is a significant feat and well worth both recognition and accolades,” said Heather Allin, president of ACTRA Toronto.

“Our performers are some of the best in the world. Each and every one of our 15 nominees worked hard, created expansively and gave their all, and it shows.”

Star staff

Island Students Archiving Anne’s Days

History goes high-tech print this article
A Living Archives education project provided the platform for students in three Prince Edward Island schools to pair web-based technologies with the study of the province’s heritage
MARY MACKAY archiving
The Guardian

Students in three Prince Edward Island schools used something new to bring something old to life in this school session.

A new Living Archives project taught Grade 7 students at Stonepark Intermediate in Charlottetown, Ecole Evangeline in Abram-Village and Kensington Intermediate Senior High how to use web-based technologies to document and digitize the social history and historical artifacts relating to early 20th century life and showcase them on the web.

“This is the first time this has ever been done,” says a super enthusiastic Sam Preston of Covehead, 12, who was one of many Stonepark students who worked on the joint UPEI/Department of Canadian Heritage project.

The interwoven layers of the website features student writing, photography, videos and interviews related to their historical research which focused on a 50-year period between 1875 and 1925.

“It is like a virtual online textbook mainly,” says Sam of A Living Archives, which was implemented through UPEI’s Faculty of Education and supported by a contribution from the Canadian Culture Online Partnerships Fund.

Dave Cormier, web specialist for integrated promotions at UPEI, came up with the Living Archives concept, which uses Anne of Green Gables as a springboard.

“Anne is the context for the project,” he says.

“We started with seven excerpts from the Anne novels. We pulled out some general themes from the book and one of them was horses and transportation. So each one of the posts that the kids have done (on the website) is in some way connected to one of those seven excerpts.”

For instance, the horses and transportation theme used by Stonepark stems from Matthew’s and Anne’s carriage ride from the train station to Green Gables. Kensington focused on a general store theme. Ecole Evangeline did Acadian life.

“It’s the context they’re building from. It’s not like they’re studying Anne. They’re contextualizing Anne so they’re learning history,” Cormier says.

Research was a big part of the project, so students embarked upon field trips to the Public Archives and Records Office and the P.E.I. Museum and Heritage Foundation’s Artefactory to find the information and images they needed for their website postings.

“We would take pictures from the provincial archives and we would put them online and write stuff about them, my partners and me,” says 12-year-old Stonepark student Andy MacPhee of Stratford, whose topic was harness racing.

Other Stonepark themes included bicycles, trains, early autos and iceboats.

“We had to have three or four blogs each and then after that you put context pieces and link them to each other’s blogs. The context piece is basically telling what our project is and what you need for horse racing; like you need a sulky, what a sulky is and what it’s made of.”

Jerry Campbell is the Grade 7 social studies teacher at Stonepark whose class of 28 was involved with A Living Archives.

“The idea was that the lure of using technology to study the past would be a different, unique way for the kids to get turned on to history and their heritage, as opposed to

just the regular sit-down-open-a-book (way),” he says.

“We didn’t know exactly what was going to happen and what kind of interest the kids were going to have, but it has turned out to be pretty successful.”

Students have been working since early in the fall on their projects. The website is for the most part up and operational.

Bonnie Stewart, who is a A Living Archives project manager, says the project also allowed students to expand their literary skills in a whole new way.

“You give them the opportunity to both take ownership of their learning by the fact that they’re making something themselves — they were really proud of

the fact that they were

making an (e-)textbook themselves — and a chance to work within a virtual

world and stuff like that,” said Stewart.

“Then you get a high level of engagement, even from students who aren’t traditionally super readers in school in general or in the subject of history.”

A half-hour documentary video on the making of A Living Archives will be paired with the University of Prince Edward ?Island Faculty of Education research to document the learning potential of this cutting edge project so that other teachers and students down the road can adapt the project to their own needs.

For Sam, his exploration into his A Living Archives topic of bicycles on Prince Edward Island from 1875 to 1925 was a wonderful exploration into history and high-tech.

“I think it’s a lot better way of learning than just taking a textbook off the shelf and reading it,” he said.

It’s more interactive and you get to use a lot of technology.”

Fast facts

A Living Archives

n A Living Archives project is located at http://www.livingarchives.ca.

n Schools involved were Stonepark Intermediate in Charlottetown, Ecole Evangeline in Abram-Village and Kensington Intermediate Senior High.

n Archives themes are horses and transportation, the general store and Acadian life, all of which focus on a time period between 1875 and 1925.

n The project was a partnership between the University of Prince Edward Island, Canadian Heritage, Department of Education, Canada Culture Online Partnerships Fund, Museums and Heritage P.E.I., and Public Archives and Records Office of P.E.I.

http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/index.cfm?sid=121436&sc=100

Looking For Anne Review by Monica Stark

Looking for Anne review by January Magazine

Sunday, April 20, 2008

New this Month: Looking for Anne by Irene Gammel

If it seems like you’re suddenly hearing more about Lucy Maud Montgomery’s Anne Shirley, it’s because the first book in which Anne appeared, Anne of Green Gables, was published around this time one hundred years ago.

Earlier this year, we saw the publication of a brand new Anne book by Budge Wilson, Before Green Gables (Penguin Canada). Now noted biographer Irene Gammel brings us Looking for Anne (Key Porter Books) a brilliantly researched, in-depth and charming biography on both Lucy Maud Montgomery and her Titian-haired creation and brings us more than a few surprises. For example, we discover that Anne Shirley was as much a product of the zeitgeist as she was of innocent inspiration.

Author Gammel, who holds the research chair in modern literature and culture at Ryerson, tells us she was intrigued by the mystery that had surrounded Montgomery’s most famous literary creation. The book, Gammel writes, “was sparked by a paradox and a mystery.”

With over fifty million copies of the novel sold, a multi-million-dollar tourist industry, and countless adaptations of the novel and its sequels in musicals, movies, cartoons, dolls, and figurines, millions of fans know Anne Shirley intimately, but they know surprisingly little about how she came about. How can a work be so famous and yet its history so little known? We know more about other literary texts whose creation is shrouded in mystery, such as Cervantes’ Don Quixote, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, or Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Erye, than we know about Anne of Green Gables.

Gammel never manages to lift all the secrets, but she makes some pretty strong inroads. Fans and scholars of this enduring book will leave it knowing — or suspecting — much that had been in the dark before.

Labels:

Irene is a former teacher of my wife Junko when they where at the University of Prince Edward Island.  Island Spirit PEI also had the honor of sponsoring the Ryerson Showcase : Anne of Green Gables Centenary which she lead. anne-of-green-gables-ryerson-showcase

Anne of Green Gables is an Evergreen

‘Anne of Green Gables’ is an evergreen
The sheer vitality of L.M. Montgomery’s adventure-seeking 1908 title character is as fresh as ever at 100.
By Julia Keller, Chicago Tribune
May 23, 2008
The planks that made up her bedroom wall did not fit together properly, so when she would wake up on winter mornings in an old house on Prince Edward Island, Canada, often there were snowdrifts on the floor. To keep warm while she wrote her stories, she had to curl up her legs and sit on her feet. Her secondhand typewriter lacked a “w” key.

Still she wrote. (Or “rote,” as it would have appeared in her typewritten version.) Obstacles, hardships, setbacks, impediments — they counted for nothing. Lucy Maud Montgomery, who roomed with relatives because her mother had died when she was an infant and her father left to seek his fortune elsewhere, was a small woman with a staggeringly strong will. Her imagination was a driving force that would not be denied.

When Montgomery finished her first novel, she mailed it to publisher after publisher. The rejection slips piled up like the snowdrifts in that bedroom.

And then, after more than two dozen publishers had said no, one finally said yes, and the young orphan known as Anne Shirley — don’t forget the “e” at the end of “Anne,” or she’ll let you know about it — was born into the world of readers.

“Anne of Green Gables” was published in June 1908, which means that soon it will be a century old. Yet “old” doesn’t go with the character, because if there is one thing we know about Anne, it’s that this lively, redheaded streak of exuberance, no matter her chronological age, is now and forevermore associated with youth.

Montgomery ultimately would write 24 novels, including seven more about Anne’s adventures on the ruggedly beautiful island that constitutes Canada’s smallest province. She’d also account for 530 short stories and more than 500 poems. Anne, however, was easily her most famous creation. Before Montgomery’s death in 1942 at age 67, she saw the child of her imagination — the plucky, fearless, boundary-pushing girl who was a perpetual magnet for trouble — become an international sensation. Her story was made into several movies and it inspired fan letters from around the world.

A paperback copy of any volume in the series will cost you about $5, which means that you can jump into Anne’s world for the price of a Starbucks venti latte. Trust me: After a few rollicking, helter-skelter chapters, you won’t need the caffeine anyway.

Anne has a habit of getting into “scrapes,” as her guardian, the dour Marilla, puts it. In fact, that is the chief pleasure of the Anne books: They recognize, as so many other books with young females as protagonists do not, that girls like to run and jump and get dirty and explore the woods and have adventures just as much as boys do. A century after Anne got herself tangled up in scrape after scrape, the lesson still hasn’t sunk in. The recent bestseller “The Dangerous Book for Boys” (2007) is great — but its prejudice is plain in its title. Don’t bother telling me about “The Daring Book for Girls” (2007), a thin attempt to play catch-up; all you need to know is that when USA Today reviewed the latter, the headline was: “Books for Girls Chase After the Boys.” Can’t you see Anne cringing at that?

Montgomery’s tales have held up well across the decades. There is a good deal of artistry in the books, but it is so seamlessly deployed that young readers likely won’t notice it — an enormous tribute to the author’s skills. There is a bright light at the center of these stories, a wholesomeness that might prove cloying were it not for the ornery, unrepentant nature of Anne’s impetuosity. She’s a rascal. And rascals captivate.

Montgomery’s life, alas, would prove to be far darker than that of her fictional creation. She was married to a minister, and his clinical depression became increasingly debilitating. For more than two decades, Montgomery hid her husband’s affliction from the world while struggling to raise their two children and keep writing her books. Burdened with unrelieved physical pain toward the end of her life, she became dependent on prescription medication. Her letters to friends, once cheerful, grew bitter.

There is no pleasing platitude to soften such a fate. Nor would Montgomery, a strong and accomplished woman brought low by circumstance, want us to waste our time in search of one. If there is a lesson to be learned from her life, it lies in a sentence from “Anne of Green Gables”: “Next to trying and winning,” Anne says, “the best thing is trying and failing.” The magic glimmers in the effort, not the outcome.