Everything Anne

It’s Everything Anne time again in Ontario!

A fun Anne of Green Gables event at Bala's Museum

A fun Anne of Green Gables event at Bala's Museum

On July 24th 1:30 to 4:00 pm at Bala’s Museum we are in for a treat.

3 Legged Races & Sack Races

Egg-on-a-spoon Races

Free Popcorn & Cake

Prizes for Best Character Costumers (cosplay)

Bala’s Museum – With Memories of Lucy Maud Montgomery is home to one of, if not the most impressive historical collections of Anne of Green Gables memorabilia in the world.

Their name shows local pride and respect for the author, but don’t let that fool you into thinking they are like on our favorite heroine.

Everything the classic hardcovers, collectibles, family heirlooms and even the Lady of Shallot boat from the motion picture.

As we found out last week, it is certainly worth ride to Bala’s Museum in the Cranberry Capital of Canada.

‘Anne of Green Gables’ is an evergreen

COMMENTARY

The sheer vitality of L.M. Montgomery’s adventure-seeking 1908 title character is as fresh as ever at 100.

The planks that made up her bedroom wall did not fit together properly, so when she would wake up on winter mornings in an old house on Prince Edward Island, Canada, often there were snowdrifts on the floor. To keep warm while she wrote her stories, she had to curl up her legs and sit on her feet. Her secondhand typewriter lacked a “w” key.

Still she wrote. (Or “rote,” as it would have appeared in her typewritten version.) Obstacles, hardships, setbacks, impediments — they counted for nothing. Lucy Maud Montgomery, who roomed with relatives because her mother had died when she was an infant and her father left to seek his fortune elsewhere, was a small woman with a staggeringly strong will. Her imagination was a driving force that would not be denied.

When Montgomery finished her first novel, she mailed it to publisher after publisher. The rejection slips piled up like the snowdrifts in that bedroom.

And then, after more than two dozen publishers had said no, one finally said yes, and the young orphan known as Anne Shirley — don’t forget the “e” at the end of “Anne,” or she’ll let you know about it — was born into the world of readers.

“Anne of Green Gables” was published in June 1908, which means that soon it will be a century old. Yet “old” doesn’t go with the character, because if there is one thing we know about Anne, it’s that this lively, redheaded streak of exuberance, no matter her chronological age, is now and forevermore associated with youth.

Montgomery ultimately would write 24 novels, including seven more about Anne’s adventures on the ruggedly beautiful island that constitutes Canada’s smallest province. She’d also account for 530 short stories and more than 500 poems. Anne, however, was easily her most famous creation. Before Montgomery’s death in 1942 at age 67, she saw the child of her imagination — the plucky, fearless, boundary-pushing girl who was a perpetual magnet for trouble — become an international sensation. Her story was made into several movies and it inspired fan letters from around the world.

A paperback copy of any volume in the series will cost you about $5, which means that you can jump into Anne’s world for the price of a Starbucks venti latte. Trust me: After a few rollicking, helter-skelter chapters, you won’t need the caffeine anyway.

Anne has a habit of getting into “scrapes,” as her guardian, the dour Marilla, puts it. In fact, that is the chief pleasure of the Anne books: They recognize, as so many other books with young females as protagonists do not, that girls like to run and jump and get dirty and explore the woods and have adventures just as much as boys do. A century after Anne got herself tangled up in scrape after scrape, the lesson still hasn’t sunk in. The recent bestseller “The Dangerous Book for Boys” (2007) is great — but its prejudice is plain in its title. Don’t bother telling me about “The Daring Book for Girls” (2007), a thin attempt to play catch-up; all you need to know is that when USA Today reviewed the latter, the headline was: “Books for Girls Chase After the Boys.” Can’t you see Anne cringing at that?

Source: The Los Angles Times

Island Students Archiving Anne’s Days

History goes high-tech print this article
A Living Archives education project provided the platform for students in three Prince Edward Island schools to pair web-based technologies with the study of the province’s heritage
MARY MACKAY archiving
The Guardian

Students in three Prince Edward Island schools used something new to bring something old to life in this school session.

A new Living Archives project taught Grade 7 students at Stonepark Intermediate in Charlottetown, Ecole Evangeline in Abram-Village and Kensington Intermediate Senior High how to use web-based technologies to document and digitize the social history and historical artifacts relating to early 20th century life and showcase them on the web.

“This is the first time this has ever been done,” says a super enthusiastic Sam Preston of Covehead, 12, who was one of many Stonepark students who worked on the joint UPEI/Department of Canadian Heritage project.

The interwoven layers of the website features student writing, photography, videos and interviews related to their historical research which focused on a 50-year period between 1875 and 1925.

“It is like a virtual online textbook mainly,” says Sam of A Living Archives, which was implemented through UPEI’s Faculty of Education and supported by a contribution from the Canadian Culture Online Partnerships Fund.

Dave Cormier, web specialist for integrated promotions at UPEI, came up with the Living Archives concept, which uses Anne of Green Gables as a springboard.

“Anne is the context for the project,” he says.

“We started with seven excerpts from the Anne novels. We pulled out some general themes from the book and one of them was horses and transportation. So each one of the posts that the kids have done (on the website) is in some way connected to one of those seven excerpts.”

For instance, the horses and transportation theme used by Stonepark stems from Matthew’s and Anne’s carriage ride from the train station to Green Gables. Kensington focused on a general store theme. Ecole Evangeline did Acadian life.

“It’s the context they’re building from. It’s not like they’re studying Anne. They’re contextualizing Anne so they’re learning history,” Cormier says.

Research was a big part of the project, so students embarked upon field trips to the Public Archives and Records Office and the P.E.I. Museum and Heritage Foundation’s Artefactory to find the information and images they needed for their website postings.

“We would take pictures from the provincial archives and we would put them online and write stuff about them, my partners and me,” says 12-year-old Stonepark student Andy MacPhee of Stratford, whose topic was harness racing.

Other Stonepark themes included bicycles, trains, early autos and iceboats.

“We had to have three or four blogs each and then after that you put context pieces and link them to each other’s blogs. The context piece is basically telling what our project is and what you need for horse racing; like you need a sulky, what a sulky is and what it’s made of.”

Jerry Campbell is the Grade 7 social studies teacher at Stonepark whose class of 28 was involved with A Living Archives.

“The idea was that the lure of using technology to study the past would be a different, unique way for the kids to get turned on to history and their heritage, as opposed to

just the regular sit-down-open-a-book (way),” he says.

“We didn’t know exactly what was going to happen and what kind of interest the kids were going to have, but it has turned out to be pretty successful.”

Students have been working since early in the fall on their projects. The website is for the most part up and operational.

Bonnie Stewart, who is a A Living Archives project manager, says the project also allowed students to expand their literary skills in a whole new way.

“You give them the opportunity to both take ownership of their learning by the fact that they’re making something themselves — they were really proud of

the fact that they were

making an (e-)textbook themselves — and a chance to work within a virtual

world and stuff like that,” said Stewart.

“Then you get a high level of engagement, even from students who aren’t traditionally super readers in school in general or in the subject of history.”

A half-hour documentary video on the making of A Living Archives will be paired with the University of Prince Edward ?Island Faculty of Education research to document the learning potential of this cutting edge project so that other teachers and students down the road can adapt the project to their own needs.

For Sam, his exploration into his A Living Archives topic of bicycles on Prince Edward Island from 1875 to 1925 was a wonderful exploration into history and high-tech.

“I think it’s a lot better way of learning than just taking a textbook off the shelf and reading it,” he said.

It’s more interactive and you get to use a lot of technology.”

Fast facts

A Living Archives

n A Living Archives project is located at http://www.livingarchives.ca.

n Schools involved were Stonepark Intermediate in Charlottetown, Ecole Evangeline in Abram-Village and Kensington Intermediate Senior High.

n Archives themes are horses and transportation, the general store and Acadian life, all of which focus on a time period between 1875 and 1925.

n The project was a partnership between the University of Prince Edward Island, Canadian Heritage, Department of Education, Canada Culture Online Partnerships Fund, Museums and Heritage P.E.I., and Public Archives and Records Office of P.E.I.

http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/index.cfm?sid=121436&sc=100

The Heartbreaking Truth About Anne’s Creator

It is hard to read about the tragic death of Lucy Maud Montgomery.  I    am grateful to Kate MacDonald and her family for sharing and helping people others to break free of stigma.
The Hearbreaking Truth About Anne’s Creator

Globe and Mail September 19, 2008

For many years, my family has kept a troubling secret. What has made things even more difficult is the fact that the person it involves was not only my grandmother, but one of Canada’s most beloved authors, Lucy Maud Montgomery.

Her most famous novel, Anne of Green Gables, is still a bestseller after 100 years. In addition to Anne, my grandmother wrote 19 other novels, personal journals and hundreds of short stories and poems. As well, she has been the subject of several biographical studies.

Despite her great success, it is known that she suffered from depression, that she was isolated, sad and filled with worry and dread for much of her life. But our family has never spoken publicly about the extent of her illness.

What has never been revealed is that L.M. Montgomery took her own life at the age of 67 through a drug overdose.

I wasn’t told the details of what happened, and I never saw the note she left, but I do know that it asked for forgiveness.

After having read the poignant Breakdown series on mental health in The Globe and Mail during the summer, I was inspired to reflect upon my own family’s history with depression.

Additionally, the recent focus on my grandmother’s creativity – this is the 100th anniversary of the publication of Anne of Green Gables, with events around the world celebrating Anne and her creator – has encouraged me to end our silence.

I have come to feel very strongly that the stigma surrounding mental illness will be forever upon us as a society until we sweep away the misconception that depression happens to other people, not us – and most certainly not to our heroes and icons.

Obviously it can happen to anyone. The public faces of such prominent Canadians as Roméo Dallaire, James Bartleman, Valerie Pringle and others who supported mental-health awareness during the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health’s recent publicity campaign have also had a powerful effect on me.

But, most important, the legacy of L.M. Montgomery, and my grandfather, Rev. Ewan Macdonald, and its related responsibilities and joys, are taken very seriously by my family. I spoke with them before writing this essay and we agreed that it was important for us to share our family’s story.

I never knew my grandmother. She died in 1942, before I was born. My grandfather, who also suffered from serious mental illness, died the following year. I got to know them through my father.

After my two older brothers married and left home, I had my parents all to myself for a few short years before my father, a physician at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, died in 1982. I became closer to him while I studied at the dining-room table – a time when we had a lot of conversations together. We developed a deeper connection during his last years and I am grateful for those memories of our time together.

When the last volume of The Selected Journals of L.M. Montgomery was published in 2004, I sobbed through it and, in fact, I couldn’t even finish it – there was such a profound sadness for me in imagining how my father must have coped with two such depressed parents.

For a young man in the prime of his life, it must have been an overwhelming responsibility. I remembered our late-night conversations and how he shared many memories, yet rarely talked about the burdens he must have felt during his young adult life.

My heart aches for my father, who was left behind to deal with the grief of losing his beloved mother. He carried the secret of the circumstances of her death and maintained the façade of a proper and well-adjusted family because of his desire to protect them and their reputation in the community.

Reading between the lines

L.M. Montgomery’s most famous character, Anne Shirley, declared, “My life is a perfect graveyard of buried hopes,” and readers find it one of Anne’s more endearing sayings. That particular lament has always been especially significant to me as I imagine my grandmother must have felt the same sadness at times in her life. The fictional Anne went on to happiness and a life full of love and fulfilment. My grandmother’s reality was not so positive, although she continues to inspire generations of readers with her books, which reveal her understanding of nature – both in matters of the heart and the world. Although she was a very successful author, her life was overshadowed by her depression, coping with her husband’s mental illness and the restrictions of her life as a clergyman’s wife and mother in an era when women’s roles were highly defined.

Even though I never met them, I’ve always regarded my paternal grandparents with great affection because of their influence on my father and, therefore, on me. I grew up admiring their achievements, both professional and personal, through my father’s stories and reminiscences.

My heart aches for them, as well, because I know they were part of a generation that simply did not acknowledge personal dysfunction, let alone seek help.

I have great admiration for my grandmother, for her contribution to Canadian literature and culture, her strength of character, and the love, pride and sense of responsibility she gave to my family.

I am proud of her courage, given how isolated and lonely she must have felt during certain periods of her life. I wish that her family or community had had some of the tools that are available today. I expect that most families continue to be bewildered about how to help loved ones who suffer from debilitating depression.

I hope that by writing about my grandmother now there might be less secrecy and more awareness that will ease the unnecessary suffering so many people experience as a result of such depressions.

An encouraging light

The recent Globe and Mail series certainly sheds an encouraging light on the notion of the “perfect” family, acknowledging that it may include the reality of depression and other mental illness, and suggests that the shame surrounding these subjects may be lifting.

I’ll never know if my grandmother might have been inclined to seek help if she had lived in a less judgmental era or if she had had access to supportive therapy or the medications available today. I would like to think so.

I long to tell her how I wish her family could have known how to help her and how proud we all are of her accomplishments. I also wish that, while my father was still alive, my family could have helped one another more by talking more openly about our feelings around her death. We realize now that secrecy is not the way to deal with the reality of depression and other mental-health issues.

Kate Macdonald Butler is the daughter of Stuart Macdonald, who was the youngest son of L.M. Montgomery.

I briefly met Benjamin at the Ryerson Showcase : Anne of Green Gables Centenary that Island Spirit PEI sponsored. He was friendly and really knows his Anne films.  I hope to read his book someday.

A kindred spirit,

Jason

Eternally Anne

IMAGINING ANNE

The Island Scrapbooks

of L. M. Montgomery

By Elizabeth Rollins Epperly

Penguin Canada, 170 pages, $39
BEFORE GREEN GABLES

By Budge Wilson

Penguin Canada, 447 pages, $25.

LOOKING FOR ANNE

How Lucy Maud Montgomery Dreamed Up a Literary Classic

By Irene Gammel

Key Porter, 312 pages, $32.95

‘Anne of Green Gables is worth a thousand of the problem stories with which the bookshelves are crowded today, and we venture the opinion that this simple story of rural life in Canada will be read and reread when many of the more pretentious stories are all forgotten. There is not a dull page in the whole volume …”

So proclaimed The Toronto Globe in 1908. A century later, this prediction continues to prove true: Despite the immeasurable changes that have swept over the world in the past 100 years, the life and work of Lucy Maud Montgomery continue to appeal to readers of all ages, genders and backgrounds. Although literary fads have likewise changed since Anne of Green Gables first appeared on the scene, today’s readers of Montgomery’s debut novel still agree with Mark Twain’s public endorsement, in which he declared, “In Anne of Green Gables, you will find the dearest and most moving and delightful child since the immortal Alice.”

Montgomery’s appealing story of a redheaded orphan from away who transforms the lives of the inhabitants of a P.E.I. settlement is available to readers not only in its original form, but also through adaptations and spin-offs such as films, television series, musicals, abridgments, tourist sites and commodities. On my dresser at home, I proudly display all my Anne kitsch, which includes shot glass, ashtray, thimble, commemorative spoon, keychain, matching pencils with Anne and Diana heads, toenail clippers and potato chips (“sliced extra thin and crunchy for a more distinctive potato taste”).

It may seem perplexing to the uninitiated that these bizarre items can be at all related to a classic literary text that I keep rereading, but together they make for a unique form of Canadian culture. Montgomery wrote numerous sequels to Anne (the exact number depends on how devoted a reader you are), but none of these comes close to matching the appeal of this first book. In a way, these derivative texts and things become ways to keep the story going, to delay its inevitable end.

Coinciding with the novel’s centennial anniversary are three books that likewise serve to extend the original story. While at least four reissues of Montgomery’s novel will appear this year in Canada alone (all of Montgomery’s work published in her lifetime has been in the public domain since 1993), each of these books finds a distinctive way to solve the puzzle of how Montgomery’s appealing character came into being.

Imagining Anne, prepared by internationally renowned Montgomery scholar Elizabeth Rollins Epperly, reproduces more than 100 pages from two of Montgomery’s personal scrapbooks from 1893 to 1910. Supplemented by Epperly’s introduction and careful annotations, these

neglected scrapbooks are crucial to our understanding of the ways in which Montgomery pieced together her bestselling fiction.

The pieces that form the individual pages – newspaper and magazine clippings, calling cards, invitations, photographs and programs – are all of interest by themselves, but what proves especially fascinating is how these items work together in their selection and arrangement. As Epperly shows, each page of Montgomery’s scrapbooks implies a story, about womanhood, about relationships, about writing. And while Montgomery viewed her journals as a container for emotions she trained herself to suppress in public, these scrapbook pages keep sorrows and disappointments hidden beneath the surface.

Perhaps the most controversial of the three books here is Before Green Gables, a prequel that was fully authorized by Montgomery’s heirs. Written by Budge Wilson, the author of more than 30 novels for children (including the Governor-General’s Award-nominated Friendships and four titles in the Our Canadian Girl series), this prequel attempts to account for Anne’s early life by expanding upon the few “bald facts” that the 11-year-old offers Marilla Cuthbert on her arrival at Green Gables. Wilson does not attempt to mimic Montgomery’s writing style – the novel contains no wordplay or parody, no literary allusions to the canonical British and American texts that would have been known to readers of Montgomery’s background – but what she offers instead is a story that humanizes characters who appear on the fringes of Montgomery’s text. We see Walter and Bertha Shirley exhibiting many of the qualities that Anne would inherit – love, harmony and the ability to transform the lives of those around them.

Under Wilson’s pen, Anne’s foster parents become more complex people, who are well-intentioned despite the narrowness brought upon them by years of poverty and restricted options, and Anne’s life is rounded out by supporting characters who are kind and sympathetic to her, including two schoolteachers and several neighbours.

Wilson’s novel refuses to sugarcoat the neglect and abuse that Anne endures in two households in which she is literally a servant; adding these humanizing elements is necessary to soften the blow, but it does create problems when we view the novel as a precursor of Montgomery’s own work. It implies that Anne tells Marilla a very selective version of her past, which is troubling due to the fact that it is on the basis of Marilla’s pity for Anne’s “starved, unloved life” that she allows the orphan to stay.

These detractions aside, what is most appealing about Wilson’s book is Anne herself: her ability to make the best of her circumstances, her love of learning, her keen appreciation of the natural world and her delight in Montgomery’s favourite natural image in her series, “the bend in the road.”

Wilson does not mine all of Montgomery’s hints for her work: Her Anne expresses no anxiety about the plainness of her name, and her refuge in alter egos named Cordelia and Geraldine is not part of the story. But while the links to Montgomery’s series are not always seamless, Before Green Gables is nevertheless a captivating story in its own right.

While Wilson’s novel will appeal to readers searching for a new Anne story, Irene Gammel’s Looking for Anne (to be published in April) will captivate those interested in the behind-the-scenes of Montgomery’s breakthrough novel. Gammel, a Canada Research Chair in Modern Literature and Culture at Toronto’s Ryerson University, takes her readers on a tour of Montgomery’s life and influences, sifting through the layers of Montgomery’s hints and contradictory statements to recreate the process of “brooding up” and writing Anne of Green Gables.

Drawing on a vast array of neglected and unknown sources, this groundbreaking study establishes new connections between Montgomery’s isolated life in Cavendish, P.E.I., and the metropolitan existence that she consumed vicariously through magazines published in New York, Boston and Philadelphia. As I read extracts from unpublished journal entries, from neglected periodical pieces and from secondary sources I had been unaware of, I was struck again and again by how many connections I had not yet considered. Looking for Anne is a highly readable, top-rate study that will provide a new spin on Montgomery’s text.

Taken together, these three books demonstrate that as far as Anne of Green Gables is concerned, there is so much more to enjoy, so much more to discover, so much more to appreciate about a character who continues to appeal to readers all around the world.

Benjamin Lefebvre, co-chairman of the L. M. Montgomery Research Group (http://lmmresearch.org), is preparing Montgomery’s unpublished final novel, The Blythes are Quoted, for publication.

Anne of Green Gables Musical Coming to Toronto

The Anne of Green Gables Musical is Coming to Toronto

Canada’s longest running musical, seen by over three million worldwide is coming to Toronto.   The original production from The Confederation Centre of The Arts in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island is coming to Toronto thanks to DanCap Productions.

The musical will run May 7th, to May 31st, 2009.

Seating Charts are available here

  • Saturday Evening – $155 -$260
  • Sunday and Saturday Matinee $135-$230
  • Thursday and Friday Evening $115-$220
  • Wednesday Evening – $105-$205
  • Wednesday Matinee $100- $190

Directions

By TTC: Subway to Queen Station. Exit to street. The theatre is on the east side of Yonge Street at Queen St.

By Car: QEW or 401 to Yonge St. Proceed north or south on Yonge to Queen.

“Anne of Green Gables – The Musical, is a must see. This spunky, entertaining and delightful production has proven why it is Canada’s longest running musical.”
– Lisa Vlooswyk, The Calgary Herald

Elgin Theatre 189 Yonge Street

ACT 1
Anne of Green Gables – Full Company
Great Workers for the Cause – Rachel Lynde and the Ladies
Where is Matthew Going? – The Townspeople
Gee I’m Glad I’m No One Else But Me – Anne
We Clearly Requested a Boy – Marilla, Anne and Matthew
The Facts – Anne, Mrs. Spencer, Mrs. Blewett and Marilla
Where’d Marilla Come From? – The Townspeople
Humble Pie – Matthew and Anne
The Apology – Anne
Back to School Ballet – The Pupils
Avonlea We Love Thee – Mr. Phillips and the Pupils
Wondrin’ – Gilbert
Did You Hear? – Josie and the Townspeople
Ice Cream – Diana and Company
The Picnic – The Company

ACT 2
Where Did the Summer Go To? – Gilbert and the Pupils
Kindred Spirits – Anne and Diana
Open the Window – Miss Stacy and the Pupils
The Words – Matthew
Open the Window (reprise) – Miss Stacy and the Pupils
Nature Hunt Ballet – The Pupils
I’ll Show Him – Anne and Gilbert
General Store – Lucilla, Matthew and the Townspeople
Pageant Song – The Pupils
If It Hadn’t Been for Me – The Company
There is a Golden Summer – Gilbert and the Pupils
Anne of Green Gables – Matthew
The Words (reprise) – Marilla
Wondrin’ (reprise) – Anne and Gilbert

Confed Center Pictures

Don Harron, Writer and Co-Lyricist
Writer Don Harron hatched the idea of creating a musical of Anne of Green Gables while reading the book to his daughter. In penning the musical-first for television, then for the stage-he “ tried to be as faithful as possible to L. M. Montgomery’s story.”

Norman Campbell, Composer and Co-Lyricist
The lilting melodies of Anne of Green Gables were composed by Norman Campbell. He worked closely with Mr. Harron to create the musical, but distance was an obstacle. Recalls Mr. Campbell: “We were in different cities, so we mostly composed over the phone”.

Elaine Campbell, Co-Lyricist
Songwriter Elaine Campbell was in hospital, about to give birth, when she penned the words to “Gee, I’m Glad”. At the time, she says: “I never imagined that one day I would see the show performed in New York, London, or Osaka.”

Mavor Moore, Artistic Director and Co-Lyricist
It was artistic director Mavor Moore who brought Anne of Green Gables, the Musical to Charlottetown. He commissioned the stage version, negotiated the rights and headed the production team. On top of that, he wrote the lyrics to three songs.

Alan Lund, Stage Director and Choreographer
The dance and staging that bring Anne of Green Gables, the Musical to life were created by Alan Lund. Although Mr. Lund was a seasoned choreographer, he had never directed a play before. Nevertheless, the original 1965 Anne staging is still in use today.

Source – Confederation Centre of the Arts

Welcome to our new community outlet.

Island Spirit PEI is an Anne of Green Gables shop.   We offer the best selection of Anne items online and are slowly updating our pictures and making videos that will be posted on this blog along with news, views and events from around Avonlea.

We hope to provide quality information and resources to our kindred spirits with this blog.  We would really appreciate your feedback on what you would like to see and learn about.

We are currently working on video.  Youtube and interactive.

A Kindred Spirit,

Jason