ISPEI welcomes The Anne of Green Gables and L. M. Montgomery Lexicon to the Blogroll

We are very happy to introduce The Anne of Green Gables and L. M. Montgomery Lexicon to our Blogroll.

The Lexicon has become a leading clearinghouse of Anne and Montgomery content.

If you ever wanted to explore Anne’s World and the writings of Montgomery online this is one site you don’t want to miss.

The menu includes:

  1. About the author
  2. list of e-texts
  3. bibliography
  4. flimography
  5. creation and publication
  6. locations
  7. timelines (by leading character)
  8. library
  9. recipes (scrumptious?  The names sound nice for sure.)
  10. book cover gallery ( a MUST see!)
  11. Famous fans
  12. book mentions
  13. memorabilia
  14. quizzes
  15. games
  16. and e-cards
  17. blog
  18. links to other LMM sites
  19. shop
  20. guestbook

Check it out.

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The Rothesay-born mezzo soprano who lives in Toronto says she’s a fan of Anne of Green Gables. ‘She is such a feisty, strong-willed character.’

Click to Enlarge
Candace McLean/canadaeast news service
q Age?

a 23

q Provenance?

a I am from Rothesay, but I currently live in Toronto. I am finishing my masters in opera performance and performing at the University of Toronto.

q Why opera?

a I love singing, acting, learning languages and have always been at home on the stage. My voice has a classical and operatic quality, which was evident even before my voice started to develop from voice lessons. I also love musical theatre – anything with singing, acting and dancing.

q What was your breakthrough moment?

a After my first year of university, I went to Mozart’s most famous opera, Marriage of Figaro, in New York City with The Acadia Vocal Ensemble. I became very passionate about opera and vocal technique. I always loved the theatre, but opera really seemed to fit.

q What would you be if you weren’t an opera singer?

a An actor; I love impersonating a character and using my emotions to communicate to an audience. Or a yoga teacher; I may even do it in conjunction with opera singing. Or a psychologist, because I love listening to people and their stories, analyzing situations and learning about behaviours.

q What are you working on next?

a The role of the child in Ravel’s French opera L’enfant et les sortileges.

q What place on earth inspires you?

a I love Italy – Rome, Tuscanny and the Amalfi coast. There is so much beauty in that country, so much history.

q Your current obsession?

a Balancing healthy eating with my love for sweets.

q What place in New Brunswick inspires you?

a Ever since I was a little girl, I have always loved the Saint John City Market. With a ceiling shaped like the bottom of a ship, the long building is filled with artisans, fresh fruit and vegetables, fish and poultry, crafts, bustling people – both artistic and business types. In memories, it is always there; it doesn’t leave with the changing of the seasons, and it is home. There really is no place like home … and I have a pair of bright and shiny red shoes to get me there.

q Secret indulgence?

a Toffee, chocolate and caramel, pies and cookies, but I am not sure how much of a secret it is.

q Your favourite hero of fiction?

a Anne of Green Gables, because she is such a feisty, strong-willed character who knows what she wants. And she is a well-known and loved Maritime fictional character.

q What is your greatest extravagance?

a Clothes. I love to dress nicely and have a classy wardrobe.

q What is your greatest fear?

a Failure. I want to succeed in my career, my relationships and my finances, have good health and still have time, energy and money to give to society.

q Greatest joy?

a To love and be loved in return – in my personal and professional life.

q Your favourite opera?

a Carmen. It is filled with passion, tragedy, wit, humour, sensuality, dancing and high drama. The orchestration, vocal writing, libretto, language and style are an absolutely spectacular package. It is the perfect musical drama, in my mind. I would love to perform the role someday.

q Favourite paintings on Earth?

a Impressionist paintings by Monet, Degas and Renoir because they are very beautiful, but they depict nature or people in a way that is not exact or defined; the artist interprets a scene and is free to colour outside of the lines. Reproductions of paintings by Degas on notebooks and posters have been cherished gifts since I was a little ballerina.

q Favourite painting by a New Brunswick artist?

a A drawing of a circle of dancers by my uncle, Brian Perkins, who worked for Festival-by-the-Sea. The festival is no longer active, but it is a part of my fond memories of summers in Saint John.

q What are you reading?

a Eat, Love, Pray by Elizabeth Gilbert

q What’s on your iPod?

a Dance and pop music, a bit of R&B, several opera albums and some rehearsal recordings of myself.

q What is the greatest public misconception about opera?

a That is is stuffy and boring and only for old people. It is entertaining, sexy and high drama!

q Your most treasured possession?

a A beautiful diamond ring from my great, great aunt Jennie Fitzgerald who was 111 years old when she died. She was a vibrant and cheerful lady, and I enjoyed visiting her at the Loch Lomond Villa, where she lived for 25 years.

q What is your favourite performance venue?

a In Rome, Italy, there is a magnificent courtyard near Piazza Navona, where I performed with Operafestival di Roma, called the Palazzo della Sapienza. The façade of the church provides an ideal scenic background for the opera, and the four-sided courtyard is a vibrant acoustical space.

Built in the 15th century and for nearly 500 years the seat of the original University of Rome, the Palazzo now houses the library of the Senate of the Roman Republic. The famous church, S. Ivo alla Sapienza, built inside the courtyard, is considered one of the architectural masterpieces of Rome.

q What is your motto?

a Life is a daring and bold adventure. Cherish yesterday, live today and dream tomorrow.

q What opera singer would you like to hear in person before you die?

a More like, who would I like to hear before they die?! lol or stop singing … Frederica von Stade. She is a beautiful mezzo soprano that has achieved abundant international acclaim and has made many recordings. I think my voice is a lot like hers and she is definately one of my role models.

Source: The Telegraph Jounral

Published in: Uncategorized on March 15, 2009 at 2:29 pm  Leave a Comment  
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‘Anne of Green Gables’ is an evergreen

COMMENTARY

The sheer vitality of L.M. Montgomery’s adventure-seeking 1908 title character is as fresh as ever at 100.

The planks that made up her bedroom wall did not fit together properly, so when she would wake up on winter mornings in an old house on Prince Edward Island, Canada, often there were snowdrifts on the floor. To keep warm while she wrote her stories, she had to curl up her legs and sit on her feet. Her secondhand typewriter lacked a “w” key.

Still she wrote. (Or “rote,” as it would have appeared in her typewritten version.) Obstacles, hardships, setbacks, impediments — they counted for nothing. Lucy Maud Montgomery, who roomed with relatives because her mother had died when she was an infant and her father left to seek his fortune elsewhere, was a small woman with a staggeringly strong will. Her imagination was a driving force that would not be denied.

When Montgomery finished her first novel, she mailed it to publisher after publisher. The rejection slips piled up like the snowdrifts in that bedroom.

And then, after more than two dozen publishers had said no, one finally said yes, and the young orphan known as Anne Shirley — don’t forget the “e” at the end of “Anne,” or she’ll let you know about it — was born into the world of readers.

“Anne of Green Gables” was published in June 1908, which means that soon it will be a century old. Yet “old” doesn’t go with the character, because if there is one thing we know about Anne, it’s that this lively, redheaded streak of exuberance, no matter her chronological age, is now and forevermore associated with youth.

Montgomery ultimately would write 24 novels, including seven more about Anne’s adventures on the ruggedly beautiful island that constitutes Canada’s smallest province. She’d also account for 530 short stories and more than 500 poems. Anne, however, was easily her most famous creation. Before Montgomery’s death in 1942 at age 67, she saw the child of her imagination — the plucky, fearless, boundary-pushing girl who was a perpetual magnet for trouble — become an international sensation. Her story was made into several movies and it inspired fan letters from around the world.

A paperback copy of any volume in the series will cost you about $5, which means that you can jump into Anne’s world for the price of a Starbucks venti latte. Trust me: After a few rollicking, helter-skelter chapters, you won’t need the caffeine anyway.

Anne has a habit of getting into “scrapes,” as her guardian, the dour Marilla, puts it. In fact, that is the chief pleasure of the Anne books: They recognize, as so many other books with young females as protagonists do not, that girls like to run and jump and get dirty and explore the woods and have adventures just as much as boys do. A century after Anne got herself tangled up in scrape after scrape, the lesson still hasn’t sunk in. The recent bestseller “The Dangerous Book for Boys” (2007) is great — but its prejudice is plain in its title. Don’t bother telling me about “The Daring Book for Girls” (2007), a thin attempt to play catch-up; all you need to know is that when USA Today reviewed the latter, the headline was: “Books for Girls Chase After the Boys.” Can’t you see Anne cringing at that?

Source: The Los Angles Times

Anne of Green Gables Movie Run Times

Anne of Green Gables - A New Beginning

A list of the Sullivan Entertainment movie run times.

Anne of Green Gables 195 minutes

Anne of Green Gables – The Sequel (Anne of Avonlea) 232 minutes

Anne of Green Gables – The Continuing Story 185 mintues

Anne of Green Gables – A New Beginning 144 minutes

Leisa Way – Anne of Green Gables Musical lead for 6 Years in Sweet Dreams: A Tribute to Patsy Cline

Posted By KATHLEEN HAY, STANDARD-FREEHOLDER

Posted 4 days ago

It’s a phrase you usually only get to see in big city theatres: “NEW BLOCK OF TICKETS ON-SALE!”

Such was not the case this time though when the spring show, Sweet Dreams: A Tribute to Patsy Cline, resulted in seats being snapped up faster than you could say walkin’ after midnight. Originally scheduled for a run April 22-26 and May 1-3, it sold-out so quickly four more shows have been added for May 8-10.

Starring Leisa Way (who captivated Playhouse audiences in The Love List two years ago) as the legendary country singer, she’s backed-up by the Wayward Wind Band (Bruce Ley, Dave Wilson and Michael Mulrooney) who are some of this country’s finest musicians.

Way, who was raised on country music, initially began her studies at the University of Toronto’s prestigious opera school in the early 1980s. Opera at that time, however, she explains had a rather “chi-chi” reputation and when her teachers were trying to persuade her to focus solely on that genre, her natural impulse lead her elsewhere.

“I had so many different interests,” she explained from her home in Orangeville. “I wanted to sing jazz, do musical theatre. I have a big voice, but I wasn’t so sure about opera.

“I’m a lead in musical theatre, but not in opera. Still, you wonder.”

Following her heart, she successfully auditioned for the lead in Anne of Green Gables at the Charlottetown Festival. For the six next years, she travelled the globe (including six tours to Japan) performing as the red-haired girl, including performing for the British Royal Family on three occasions.

Her other musical theatre credits are no less impressive. Leading roles in productions such as Showboat, 42nd Street, Crazy for You, Cats and Camelot, have seen her travel across North America and to 50 countries worldwide.

In 1997, she was asked to perform in Drayton Entertainment’s production of A Closer Walk with Patsy Cline. She took this show as far afield as Dubai and France where the universal appeal of the country star found ready fans everywhere.

“Originally, my greatest fear was performing the role of a real person, not an imaginary character in a play,” stated Way. “I thought, ‘If I don’t nail this, people are going to know it.’

“But there’s so little live footage of her as her career was so short.”

In fact, she continues, Cline’s career really only lasted six years, from 1957-63. Her first huge hit Walkin’ After Midnight was in 1957, then there was nothing again until 1960.

“She struggled and struggled,” says Way. “So many of her songs came out posthumously following her death in ’63.”

It was this show that gave Way the momentum to create her own tribute to the singer in Sweet Dreams: The Songs of Patsy Cline. The two-hour production is set on the eve of her final concert in Kansas City before a fatal flight home during nasty rainstorm in 1963. In it, she sings 27 of Cline’s hit songs peppered in between with dialogue to give a glimpse of the singing legend.

“I thought, ‘Why don’t I research this?'”Way said. “I started gleaning information from various books, I spoke to people who had recorded her live.

“I wanted to tell Patsy’s story.” What a story it was, she added.

During that era, said Way, there were hardly any women who were headline acts, much less any who would command a Las Vegas gig for $1,000 a night. Her husband beat her, but that wasn’t talked about. Instead, Cline was always the breadwinner in her relationships.

“She was so generous,” she She would help out other singers, like Loretta Lynn, Brenda Lee and Dottie West . . . she would give the shirt off her back, and then not be able to pay her own bills.

“She paved the way for other women. I love talking about her.”

Although known for her country stylings, Cline was all-around performer.

“Patsy was the first to have a cross-over hit to pop from country,” said Way. “She played Carnegie Hall, Las Vegas . . . she was not a country singer.

“She was a singer who could sing anything.”

Way’s own performance of numbers like Crazy, Walkin’ After Midnight, Sweet Dreams, Won’t You Come Home Bill Bailey, I Fall to Pieces and others have been critically hailed as a “strong clear voice and heartfelt singing to thrill any Patsy Cline fan.”

Her staggering success portraying the legendary singer inspired Way and her band to go into the studio and recapture the magic of that live performance. The CD, Sweet Dreams: The Songs of Patsy Cline, has thrilled her fans and resulted in two European tours, as well as ones to Asia and the South Pacific.

“Everything I say in the show is something Patsy said. Performing this tribute to her is an honour. I’ve been told that within five minutes, people forget and think they are at a Patsy Cline concert. That was my goal. To take them away for two hours. What better gift do you give people?” Way said.

– – –

SWEET DREAMS:A TRIBUTE TO PATSY CLINE

WHAT:Musical theatre sensation Leisa Way takes you on a two-hour journey of the late singer’s life that’s filled with hit songs and insight into what made Patsy Cline such a special person.

WHEN:May 8 to 10, in addition to previous sold-out dates of April 22- 26 and May 1-3.

WHERE:Upper Canada Playhouse, Morrisburg.

COST:$28 (adults); $24 seniors (60 and up)/students. Groups of 10 or more are $23 per person. To book tickets, call 613-543-3713.

SHOW TIMES:May 8 and 9 at 8 p. m., plus 2 p. m. matinees on May 9 and 10.

Tourism looks promising for summer season – In this recessionary year not everything is doom and gloom for Islanders

The Guardian – Prince Edward Island’s provincial newspaper. 07/03/09
Editorial

Tourism operators, along with industry and government officials, are all brimming with optimism as they look forward to the coming 2009 tourist year on P.E.I. That outlook seems well placed despite the current economic situation facing the province. Last season was disappointing, but could have been worse. Despite the high dollar, high price of gas, and record rainfall in August, the overall decline was in the single digits. Now the price of gas has dropped significantly, the dollar in below 80 cents U.S. and a lot of big things are planned for P.E.I. this summer.

Those factors may persuade more U.S. visitors to head north. We always hear that U.S. tourism drops in an election year and that proved correct in 2008. With a new president installed, maybe his stimulus package will have the desired effect of increasing the spending and purchasing habits of Americans, and boosting the optimism for our neighbours to the south.

All things point to a strong tourism year this summer across Prince Edward Island. The 2009 Canada Summer Games, scheduled for the last two weeks of August, will attract thousands of athletes, officials, family members and spectators. There will be national media coverage and that might provide a boost heading into the fall shoulder season as well.

Old Home Week is celebrating a milestone this August with the 50th running of the Gold Cup and Saucer harness race. There is sure to be extra marketing and hype associated with the race, along with the durable provincial exhibition which underwent considerable modernization efforts in 2008.

July received a big boost earlier this week with the announcement of a major three-day country music festival in Cavendish, coming to a close at the start of the Summerside Lobster Carnival Week. Maybe music fans will stick around for some extra days to enjoy the weather and the big fair in Summerside.

The 2009 tourism marketing, media and public relations plan was unveiled Thursday in Charlottetown and was well received. The TIAPEI meeting was told that a banner year in meetings and conventions is coming up. P.E.I. is already known as Canada’s top golf destination and the airing of the Golf Channel’s Big Break Prince Edward Island next month, will be sure to draw increased interest from golfers across North America and beyond. All these developments present guaranteed opportunities to grow tourism for the province.

But it will be hard to replace the big boost that the 100th anniversary of the publication of Anne of Green Gables brought in last year. That anniversary is credited with almost single-handedly salvaging what could have been a very disappointing tourism season.

The current recession has been diagnosed as almost being the result of a false state of mind. We hear so much bad news from other parts of Canada, the U.S. and beyond, that we feel the same must be true here. But our economic indicators are much more robust and we have to think ourselves out of this rut we seem to be in. We had a strong holiday shopping season, car dealers had a big year in 2008, and good things are happening with construction and infrastructure projects.

If the good news and optimism coming out of the tourism conference can be converted into changing the mind-set of Islanders that not all is gloom and doom, then things will indeed be rosier in the days ahead.

Now, if only Mother Nature will co-operate and bring us some better weather, everything should fall into place for a banner 2009 tourism year.

[God bless America and Island optimizim.  We need both.]